WELLS

WELLS

An artesian well is to be sunk at Fort Washington, Md., to supply the post.

An eight-inch artesian well is to be sunk at Sanford, N. C. There are six “whistling” wells at Eureka, Wis., ranging in depth from 120 to 160 feet through twenty feet of hard pan, the balance being gravel. Before a rainstorm, in warm weather, the wind blows out of these wells with great force, making a roaring noise, and so hot as to boil water placed on the covers. In winter a current of air is drawn in before a storm jnstas forcibly as it blows out in hot weather and cold enough to freeze water 120 feet from the surface, as quickly as if it were on the surface No pumps can stand either extreme. Within half a mile of these wells, water is obtained at a depth of from ten to thirty feet, and the wells show nothing unusual. The cause of this phenomenon cannot be discovered.

The new artesian well at the Academy. East Greenwich, R. I., is very successful. It flows fifteen gallons per minute

WELLS

WELLS

The artesian well to supply Ventnor, N. J., with water will probably reach a depth of 900 feet before the water strata are reached. At least,that is the depth of the other artesian wells in the city.

New South Wales, which has a territory of 62,000 square miles calling for irrigation, is making successful experiments in that line. The water is obtained from artesian wells.

The Arabs of the Nubian desert were recently considerably surprised, when a European military engineer officer successfully bored a well seventy.five miles from the Nile, and 1,000 feet above the river—finding water in abundance at a depth of fifty-six feet. They had assured the engineer that he would find water only when he got down to the Nile level.