Western Fire Bugs.

Western Fire Bugs.

Referring to the frequency of fires oeeurring in barns and outhousos in Denver, Col., the Times of that city says: “Within the past month there have been several of these fires, and in almost every instance there was no reason assignable for the conflagration, except in a number of cases the preparations discovered showed that there had been a systematic plan for the fire. When the character of most of our residences, and our liability to have severe winds, is taken into consideration, the matter becomes of much greater importance than the mere construction of an inexpensive shed or two, ano calls for the most vigorous measures for the detection of the scoundrels. When carefully prepared piles of kindling, shavings, etc., saturated with coal oil, are found in tho outhouses and barns, it me ns that thore aro penitentiary birds about, whose wings need clipping, and who require caging There seems to be but little doubt that many of theso fires are kindled for the purpose of facilitating a robbery, during the excitement consequent upon efforts to extinguish them, and families who are visited with theso afflictions would not go far amiss in having shot-guns well loaded and handy for use. Those persons who would deliberately start a fire are but little better than murderers, and deserve no tenderness in their treatment.

FIRE-PROOF BUILDING Material.—Captain Shaw, head of the London Fire Brigade, writes “ No Fireman has ever seen a stone stair escape when subjected to much heat ; and no internal wall supported on iron can he relied upon where build.ng supported entirely on mon columns without any wall, wood, or bnck work reaching tn the ground along the whole line of the front. At the ordinary temperature of from 6oo to 700 degrees Fahrenheit the whole building must ineasily be created by the combustion of a small uanhitv of furniture.” The conclusion seems to be that brick or iron covered with brick and which have been subjected to fire, are the materials really deserving the

Captain Shaw is not the first to make this discovery. Chicago in 1871, and Boston a year l*ter, furnished abundant demonstrations of the and iron under great heat. ton sottens and bends, or kerks, and stone goec o splinters. Heavy solid oak stands better tha~i either, and brick beats all.

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