WHEN WIRE-GLASS FAILED.

WHEN WIRE-GLASS FAILED.

Notwithstanding the insistence of fire underwriters and certain fire department officials on the infallibility of wire-glass as a fire-resistant agency, there are times when it has proved at least no better check to the course of the flames than windows of the ordinary standard type. This was recently shown, when the Empire Plowworks, of Cleveland, Ohio, were all but partially destroyed by fire. As shown in these columns at the time, the window openings in the five division sectional walls were filled with wire-glass in metal frames. On the second floor the wire-glass in the six windows was nearly all separated from the sash by rolling to the bottom in a curling lumpin one it had been curled into a vertical roll and was found hanging from, and melted to the sash. The glass was one-fourth of an inch thick, with No. 18 wire mesh, and set into the galvanised iron sash in a five-sixteenths of an inch groove, secured by one-inch steel lugs, distant about four inches from each other and then puttied in, with the glazed side facing the section in which the fire started. The windows had been attacked on both sides of the hall by the flames and exposed to a very intense heat. It is also true that the sash and the manner of setting the glass in it, as already described, were not in strict conformity with standard requirements—the iron sash having had a narrow strip of wood inside to afford it solidity and the joints being lapped, riveted and nailed to the strip.

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