Wind Spreads Flames at Chicago Fire

Wind Spreads Flames at Chicago Fire

A fire which originated at the northern end of the lumber mill of the Rittenhouse and Embree Lumber Company at Chicago, Ill., was quickly spread to the southern extremity of the building by a high wind which was blowing. Upon arrival, the department found the flames bursting through the roof of the dry kilns, where the fire had started. The department, under the leadership of Acting Assistant hire Marshal George Gilmore, did excellent work, succeeding in saving the larger part of the mill from destruction and in keeping the flames confined to the one building. During the fire one of the employees of the lumber company was burned to death. The damaged building occupied a space of 100 by 300 feet, was V/i stories high and was built 15 years ago of brick and wood. The blaze started at 12.25 p. m„ July 31, and was under control three hours later. There were 170 firemen at the fire, with 24 engines of Metropolitan, Ahrens-Fox, American-La France, Continental and Knott makes. Twentv-four engine streams were thrown from nozzles varying in size from ⅝ to 2 inches. A sufficient number of hydrants, located from 100 to 300 apart, were available. The building, valued at $60,000, was damaged to the extent of $10,000, while the contents, valued at $50,000, were completely destroyed. The contents consisted principally of finished hardwood flooring.

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