Wind Spreads Flames at Pottsville Fire

Wind Spreads Flames at Pottsville Fire

General View of Ruins of Centennial Hall in Pottsville, Pa.

A wind blowing at the rate of forty miles an hour threatened the business section of Pottsville, Pa., a short time ago when Centennial Hall caught fire. Hunting pieces of wood carried through the air by the wind, set fire to two houses eight blocks away. Chief James A. Lynaugh by good judgment succeeded in checking the spread of the flames. The building was built about forty years ago, of stone and brick, and contained wooden partitions on the first floor. It was four stories in height, and occupied a space of 66 by 90 feet on the site of the old town hall, which fire destroyed forty years ago. The damaged property was valued at $40,000, and the contents of the clothing stores, restaurant, peanut store and moving picture theatre situated therein was valued about $35,000. The loss was total. Citizens were greatly gratified over Chief Lynaugh’s work in saving the nearby buildings, and it is generally conceded that he would have also saved a large part of Centennial Hall were it not for the high wind and the start which the fire had when discovered. It is believed that the fire was of incendiary origin. In response to the alarm which came by the Gamcwell system, the department turned out with 1 Robinson gasoline triple pumper, 1 Silsby steam engine, 1 LaFrancc steam engine, 1 Clapp & Jones steam engine, 1 itayes aerial ladder and 3 chemical hose cars. Seven 6-inch double hydrants were convenient and available for use, all being within a radius of 500 feet of each other. From each of these a pressure of from 90 to 110 pounds was obtained. F’our hydrant and seven engine streams were thrown from lJ4*>nch nozzles. The nearby water main was 12 inches in diameter. Chief Lynaugh made use of an Eastman deluge set in fighting this fire.

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