Woburn Water Works Improvements

Woburn Water Works Improvements

Owing to leakage, careless waste and other causes, Woburn, Mass., needs an auxiliary supply and the neighborhood of Sucker brook is recommended as the source—this, all the more that, nothwithstanding the gradual improvement of Horn pond, as a result of removing the contaminating drainage, the supply drawn from the gallery is deteriorating in quality. A new 5,000,900-gal. pumping engine has been installed; the pumping station has been enlarged; and a new well has been sunk. It is 20 ft. in diameter and 10 ft. deeper than the old gallery adjacent to the present pumping station. The suction-connection of the new well and the pump and the new force-main-connection with the distribution system have also been laid. The same wastefulness may render necessary the metering of all the services, which almost certainly will be the case after the badly leaking and wornont cement-lined pipe has been replaced by cast iron, which will not be just at present, as the cost would be $350,000. The system needs improvement throughout, and for that reason, so as to benefit all the consumers of water, the surplus from the water department, which last year amounted to $27,676.63, should no longer be devoted to bolstering up other municipal departments. According to the report of Superintendent Robert T. Spencer, during the year the work of replacing the 4-in. cement-lined main on Boston street was begun; 4,888 ft. of pipe were laid; 5 new gates were installed; and 6 modern hydrants were substituted for those of an oldfashioned type. On Richardson street, also, 1,695 ft. of 6-in. iron pipe replaced the cement-lined that had lain there for many years; 483 ft. of temporary 2-in. main was also laid; a 6-in. service was installed for fire protection for a factory on Main street —1,333 ft. of it being 6-in., and the remaining 4(H), 4-in. cast iron pipe, with 3 hydrants and one gate; 37 new services and 75 new service boxes were set; 85 new gates, 13 new gate-boxes, and 13 meters were set—a total of 377 hydrants, public and private, 446 stop-gates, fifty-five smaller than 4-in.; 17 blow-off gates, 3,188 service taps; 75 meters (13 added during the year); 10 motors and elevators (1 added during the year) ; 57.21 miles of cement-lined and cast-iron pipes (1,773 extended during the year and 5.81 miles less than 4-in.) laid in the city. The pumping machinery is Worthington, Blake, new 5,000,noo-gal. pump by the Platt Iron Works company of Camden, N. J.; total pumpage for the year by old pumps, 604,474,370, without allowance of 17 per cent, for slippage. The present source of supply is filter gallery near How Pond; mode of supply, pumping direct and to reservoir. The estimated total population at date is 14,400; on line of pipe, 14,300; supplied, 14.3(H); total consumption for the year. 604,494,370 gal.; passed through meters, 81,287,180; percentage of consumption metered, .134; average daily consumption, 1,656,148.9; gallons per day to each inhabitant, 114.69. The system, which is owned by the city, was installed in 1873-74, has cost up to date, $621,398.72. It includes a pumping station, Worthington pump, Blake pump—installed in 1882, 2 125-horsepower boilers being added in 1896, 8,000,000-gal. reservoir merely excavated, not lined or covered. The distributing system originally consisted of cement-lined pipe, which is gradually being superseded by cast iron, although in spite of constantly recurring breaks a new 14-in. cement-lined main was laid in 1889. The gross receipts from all sources were $51,134.04; maintenance cost, $25,740.

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