Wooden Water Mains.

Wooden Water Mains.

In a recent paper read before the American Society of Civil Engineers by James D. Schuyler, member of the American Society of Civil Engineers, on “The Waterworks of Denver, Col.,” it is stated that 16 miles of 30 in. wooden conduit were constructed in that work, in addition to a considerable length of 44 in. pipe. The timber used was California redwood, and the 30 in. conduit was constructed to stand under a head of 185 feet. The total average cost of the 30 in. pipe is given at $1.36 per lineal foot, of which about 48 cents constituted the cost of trenching and back filling. A gang of eight to sixteen men laid from 150 to 300 feet of the same size conduit per day. These mains were composed of staves dressed very smooth to cylindrical sides and radial edges, and were held to the cylindrical form by mild steel bands placed at a distance apart depending upon the head, but never exceeding 17 inches. 1’he pores of the wood are filled with the water under pressure so that it oozes through to a slight extent, thus realizing the condition for permanent preservation. The pipe is framed in the trench, and all handling in full-sized sections is avoided; at the same time the interior finish is so smooth that the most advantageous conditions of flow are secured. The writer estimated that the use of these wooden conduits effected a saving of over $1,000,000 in this particular work.

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Wooden Water Mains.

Wooden Water Mains.

A recent paper read before the American Society of Civi Engineers by James D. Schuyler, M. Am. Soc. C. E., on “The Water-works of Denver, Col.,” contained some very interesting observations and figures relating to this subject. He states that sixteen miles of thirty-inch wooden conduit were constructed in that work in addition to a considerable length of forty-four inch pipe. The timber used was California redwood, and the thirty-inch conduit was constructed to stand under a head of 185 feet. We understand from the paper named that the total average cost of the thirty-inch pipe was $1.36 per lineal foot, of which about forty-eight cents constituted the cost of trenching and back filling. A gang of eight to sixteen men laid from 150 to 300 feet of the same size conduit per day. These mains were composed of staves dressed very smooth to cylindrical sides and radial edges, and were held to the cylindrical form by mild steel bands placed at a distance apart depending upon the head, but never exceeding seventeen inches. The pores of the wood are filled with the water under pressure, so that it oozes through to a slight extent, thus realizing the condition for permanent preservation. The pipe is framed in the trench, and all handling in full size sections is avoided ; at the same time the interior finish is so smooth that the most advantageous conditions of flow are secured.

Mr. Schyuler estimates that the use of these wooden con. duits effected a saving of over $1,000,000 in this particular work.