WORK BEGUN ON ABERDEEN GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM

WORK BEGUN ON ABERDEEN GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM

Surveys and other preliminary work has been started on the new gravity water system at Aberdeen, Wash. It was after four years of agitation by city officials that the citizens voted to spend $500,000 for a larger and better supply. The system will be capable of supplying the city with 15,000,000 gallons of water daily, which is ten times more than the present daily consumption. The entire project is to be done by Aberdeen men under the supervision of an engineer employed by the city, and it is expected to have more than 300 men at work by November. The 23 ½ miles of 32-inch wood pipe to be used will be purchased in local mills, and this, together with the laying, will involve an expenditure of close to $300,000. The water is to come from a point in the Wishkah River, 23½ miles north of the city. At the point of the proposed dam the Wishkah river is 30 feet wide, and varies in depth from a few feet to 22 inches in the dry season. The water flows over a bed formed by rocks and large boulders. On one side the river is shut in by an almost perpendicular rock wall to the canyon. The proposed dam site is several miles beyond the point where the last logging operations were conducted, and all the sources of the river are amidst a forest of green timber to which the woodsman has not yet penetrated. The new water plan is expected to be largely self-supporting and to be able to pay both the principal and interest on the $500,000 loan secured to build it. It is estimated that Aberdeen at present earns about $24,000 a year from its water system. The new gravity system will save $10,000 annually over the present system by reducing engineering rentals and fuel costs. The plant’s present earnings capacity, together with the added saving, will give the city $34,000 yearly to pay interest and principal. The interest during the first and heaviest years is but $27,500. As a means of securing additional water, if any is ever needed, Engineer Thomson, of Seattle, has suggested the building of a canal from the Wishkah to the Wynooche. the two streams being close at hand. This, it is argued, would give Aberdeen water for hundreds of thousands of people. Furthermore, by allowing the Wishkah, augmented by the Wynooche flow, to run over falls, it is likely that considerable electrical power could be developed.

Point at Which Aberdeen, Wash., Proposes to Build Dam for New Gravity Water System.

Photo courtesy “The Oregonian,” Portland, Ore.

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