Work Begun on the Cauvery River Dam.

Work Begun on the Cauvery River Dam.

Work has practically begun on the Cauvery River Dam about 9 miles above Seringapatam. This dam is to keep up the How of water in seasons of deficient rainfall and to irrigate an enormous tract of land lying uncultivated between the French Rocks and Chennapatna. It is estimated that 10,000 coolies will be employed. The enterprise is to be carried out departmentally. The headquarters establishment will be on the site of the dam, the superintending force consisting of a superintending engineer, three executive engineers, and seven assistant enginers. Comfortable residences and offices will be guilt on the spot for this force of engineers and other officials connected with tlie work. Cottages will be erected for the accommodation of the laborers and will be under strict sanitary control. There will be a hospital and schools, and an effort will be made to run the whole business, so fas as labor employed is concerned, on the plan that has been followed in the construction of the Panama Canal. The machinery works for m rtar mills and stone dressing will be run by oil. gas, or electric power, comparative estimates for which have been called for. The railway station nearest the works adjoins Seringapatam, on the Coorg Road, and will presently become a busy center for the. discharge of materials. The bowlders are to be had at the site, and lime is being collected in thousands of tons from the adjoining fields of French Rocks and Mandya. American engineers have had so much to do with engineering works in Mysore State that it is altogether likely that American machinery and American influence will play considerable part in the construction of this great dam and in the distribution and use of water after it has been accumulated. The splendid opportunities of this kind to be taken advantage of in India require competent engineers on the spot. At present about 200 horse-power of the current from the Cauvery Falls is available for the electrification of the Bangalore tramway, upon which work has begun. When the reservoir is complete the available power will he about 5.000 horse-power more. Work on the tramway is in charge of Mr. Reames, the chief electrical engineer in Mysore. The survey indicates that about 10 miles of the line will be laid from Basvangudi, south of the fort, to Frasertown, in the north of the civil and military station, with a branch from the city to the Malleswaram extension.—Consul General William H. Michael, Calcutta.

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