Work of a Cyclone.

Work of a Cyclone.

During the cyclonic gale that swept over New York city and part of New Jersey on April 19, the H. P. Worthington Pump Works at Harrison, in the latter State, were damaged to the amount of $10,000. Considering the immense space covered by the firm’s plant and the character of the buildings, it is a matter of wonder that the destruction was not greater. The pattern shop received the whole force of the gale, which tore off a large portion of the solidly constructed roof, part of which was carried to a distance of 75 ft. and literally hurled against the foundry, which was fortunately empty at the time. The pattern shop is a 4-story brick building, situated in the lower part of the works. It is about 700 ft. long and close upon 70 ft. wide. The roof was of timber coated with tar paper, and of this a section 125 ft. long and about 35 ft. wide was torn off. The girders were 12 in. square, 17 ft. long and weighed about 500 lb. each. Some of these, being driven through sections of the foundry wall, made big gaps—one fully 5 ft. square—•. in the side of the building, and in the chipping shop, where the castings are cleaned by large rumblers, the latter were badly damaged by the flying timbers. One of these hit the electric motor and put it out of business; another crashed through a window and penetrated a depth of a foot into the ground. Fifty feet of the wall of the chipping shop was so badly torn and buckled that it will have to be rebuilt. A steel car used to cart refuse from the foundry was buried under the debris and wrecked. Steam and water pipes attached to the ceiling under the roof were broken and twisted. Accompanying the gale was a rainstorm, which poured into the opening at the pattern shop and did much damage to the patterns stored there; but it did not reach below the third story. With characteristic energy the work of repair was begun at once, and business went on as usual. The damage done was enough to cause an ordinary firm to shut down; but the H. R. Worthington company is not so easily discomfited. The accompanying cut, reproduced through the courtesy of the Newark Evening News, gives a good idea of the destructive energy of the windstorm.

SHOWING DAMAGE DONE BY A GALE AT THE WORTHINGTON HYDRAULIC WORKS, HARRISON, N. J.

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