WOULD SELL JERSEY WATER.

WOULD SELL JERSEY WATER.

Eagerness to lease the driven wells in Belleville, formerly used to give part of the water supply for Newark, N. J. has again been shown by the Hudson County Water company, which sent a strong deputation to the board of works. It was explained that the company desired to lease the wells to fill a contract to furnish water for Richmond borough, New York city. The board referred the whole question to City Counsel Nugent to decide whether commissioners had a right to lease the wells. It was explained to the members of the committee that the company had a contract to deliver water on Staten Island. They wanted the wells in Belleville as a source of supply, but were determined to sink w-ells of their own, if they could not lease the local wells. The deputation declared that the company had no connection w ith the East Jersey Water company and that neither concern or its officers had stock in the other concern. Two laws, chapters 105 of 1904, and j66 of 1907, having a bearing on the matter, were brought up in the course of the ensuing discussion. The act of 1904 provides that any city may sell, exchange, lease or convey any public land not needed or desired for public purposes. The act of 1907 provides that no city may sell any public utility, including “the waterworks.” The claim was put forward that that latter act applied only to water plants that were in use by the city, and not to an abandoned plant like the one they seek to lease. The argument was used that, although it is illegal to divert the surface-water of the State, well-water does not come under that head and, therefore, is not included in the potable water act.

It is claimed by experts that there is an abundant supply of artesian water under, and round Fort Worth, Tex.

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